Promotion and Tenure (Suny Series Frontiers in Education): Community and Socialization in Academe

Promotion and Tenure (Suny Series Frontiers in Education): Community and Socialization in Academe

SUNY Press
9780791429785
0791429784
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Book Description

Articulates salient problems of tenure-track faculty, especially women and faculty of color. Offers a new paradigm to delineate ways in which the academic community can help socialize younger faculty, and honor differences more readily.

“I think that this is one of the most interesting books on higher education that I have read in quite a while. It is also a good antidote to some of the negative books on higher education in recent years.”—Philip G. Altbach, Boston College

“The topic is of great importance. The tenure process and the notions of academic freedom are being questioned by people within and outside the academic community. This study makes a significant contribution to an important field of study by offering insight into real life situations of pre-tenure faculty while also considering issues of diversity in the pre-tenure faculty ranks.”—Caroline S. Turner, University of Minnesota

Research on the organizational culture in higher education affirms that congruent cultures are better than fragmented ones, and that managing culture is an oxymoron. Such analyses often lead to the assumptions that unity of purpose is essential and leadership is impossible. This book reframes rather than suppresses these notions, and by respecting the differences, builds a commonality between them.

Using data on faculty socialization in academe, the authors consider how the work of cultural leadership becomes interpretation and facilitation rather than management. Through a series of interviews using experimental forms of ethnographic presentation, Tierney and Bensimon articulate salient problems of tenure-track faculty, especially women and faculty of color, and address the issue of individuals voluntarily leaving the tenure-track. They offer a new paradigm to delineate ways in which the academic community can help socialize younger faculty, and honor differences more readily.